News update

The Women’s History Birmingham website is now live so please take a look to find out more about the project Birmingham Women: Past & Present Revisited and how you can get involved: http://www.womenshistorybham.org.uk/.… Continue reading

Birmingham Heritage Week events & Women’s History project

This year’s events for Birmingham Heritage Week (8-18 September) have now been announced, details here: http://birminghamheritageweek.co.uk/ I’m involved in three events: Birmingham Sheroes and Children at War on September 12 both at the… Continue reading

Birmingham Women: Past & Present Revisited

I’m excited to announce a new project by a group I’m part of called Women’s History Birmingham. ‘Birmingham Women: Past & Present Revisited’ has been supported by an Our Heritage grant from the… Continue reading

Untold Stories

I’m really pleased to be involved in this new project by the People’s Heritage Co-operative, Untold Stories: Birmingham’s Wounded Soldiers from WW1, which has been funded by a Heritage Lottery Fund First World… Continue reading

A City with No Memory?

Originally posted on Modern British Studies Birmingham In December 2014 Birmingham City Council announced drastic cuts to its budget for 2015 and beyond. The Library of Birmingham, opened in September 2013 at a… Continue reading

International Archives Day: The slashing of a painting

Birmingham Archives, Heritage & Photography at the Library of Birmingham holds the minute book which shows the damage caused to a painting in 1914 at the city art gallery by Bertha Ryland, a… Continue reading

Emma Sproson, Wolverhampton’s first female Councillor

From 1912 onwards it is difficult to trace the activities of Emma and the Wolverhampton branch of the Women’s Freedom League. She visited Stourbridge Labour Church at least twice on behalf of the… Continue reading

Emma Sproson & the 1911 census

Suffragette organisations urged women to boycott the census of 1911. Many did. Some inscribed their schedule with words of protest while others evaded the census enumerator so that they couldn’t be counted. Emma’s… Continue reading

Emma’s prison experience

In her autobiographical notes Emma provides a graphic description of her first experience in prison: ‘We were not treated as political prisoners at this time. I was number eight… My cell was 7… Continue reading

Emma’s first steps in politics

After her return to Wolverhampton Emma continued her interest in politics, attending meetings, lectures and debates. In 1895 she joined the Independent Labour Party and it was here that she met her husband-to-be,… Continue reading